Autism Spectrum Disorders and the DSM-5

One in every eighty-eight children has an autism spectrum disorder (CDC, 2008). If your child is one of the many diagnosed, this statistic represents a very real personal experience. Although children can be diagnosed with ASD regardless of race/ethnicity or socioeconomic status, the rate of occurrence for males is four times that of females (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, 2009).

Keeping informed about diagnostic changes to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is a crucial part of ensuring that your child receives the educational and therapeutic resources he or she needs. The release of the fifth Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, or the DSM-5, earlier this year greatly impacted the evaluation process for children on the autism spectrum.

This simple website is designed as a resource for parents, from those who are about to begin the evaluation process to those whose children require re-evaluation, to help them navigate the murky waters of diagnostic and classification changes to the DSM.

At Georgetown Psychology Associates, we strive to ensure the social, emotional, and cognitive well-being of your children. To find out out more about our autism spectrum evaluations, click here.

Note: This text originally appeared on a website created by Sarah O’Brien as part of her graduate program coursework in Applied Developmental Psychology at George Mason University.