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Fall 2017 - Groups forming now!

Test-Taking Anxiety

Students with test anxiety experiences extreme mental distress and performance anxiety in testing situations. Although it is normal (and even helpful!) to experience some degree of stress before an exam, those with test anxiety become anxious to such a degree that it becomes debilitating and impairs their performance. In other words, their fear becomes so excessive that it compromises their ability to concentrate, think logically, and recall previously learned information. It is not an issue of preparedness or effort. This test anxiety workshop will help students learn concrete strategies to reduce and manage anxiety so they may enter exams feeling more relaxed and confident.

Facilitator: Dr. Elizabeth Malcolm

Location: Bethesda Office

Interested in joining this group?

Child Anxiety: Helping Parents Create a Strategy Tool Box

For a multitude of reasons, childhood anxiety is being diagnosed at increasingly higher rates over the past several decades. While factors such as genetics, social media, or societal pressures may play a causal role, research has also consistently demonstrated the powerful mediating influence that parents can have on their child’s emotional functioning. As parenting anxious children carries its own particular set of challenges, without an instruction manual, the most loving and supportive parents often unintentionally increase their children’s anxiety; our natural, parental instincts to protect our children and alleviate their worries may cause us to behave in ways that actually, and unintentionally, reinforce them. Constantly providing reassurance, over-empathizing with worries, and attending too much to stressors – while perhaps providing mild and immediate relief – actually go a long way to both reinforce and exacerbate our children’s anxiety. The line is a fine one and can often leave parents wondering, “So how much is too much and how do I communicate care and concern without “over-empathizing?”

The good news is that there are clear, empirically supported answers to these questions. While professional support is often indicated, anxiety is highly treatable and parents are an essential part of the process. Both parents and children can learn strategies to minimize symptoms and improve their overall quality of life.

This workshop will educate parents about the nature of anxiety and provide evidence-based strategies to help build an anxiety management tool box.

Facilitator: Dr. Maria Zimmitti

Location: Bethesda Office

Interested in joining this group?

 

Body Image Group

Whether struggling with serious eating disorder symptoms, or experiencing general concerns with body image, a negative relationship with one’s body weight, shape, and size can have a profound impact on daily life. This group is geared towards helping older teens and young women build self-confidence and create a healthier relationship with their bodies. Sessions will focus on recognizing personal strengths, creating more positive and compassionate self-talk, and gaining support and a feeling of connection with other group members.

Facilitator: Dr. Lenka Glassman

Location: Georgetown Office

Interested in joining this group?

Winter 2017 - Groups forming now!

Emotion Regulation & Social Skills Group for Boys

Feelings come in all shapes and sizes. For some children, they experience emotions intensely and lack the ability to manage their feelings in an adaptive and safe way. Emotion regulation is an important skill that takes practice. Children who struggle with emotion regulation often experience challenges relating to their peers. Dr. Kushner is pleased to announce a 6-week summer treatment group for school-age boys (3rd to 5th grade) focused on the development and practice of emotion regulation strategies. Boys will have an opportunity to connect with same-age peers as they practice their skills together.

Location: Bethesda Office

Groups will take place for 6 consecutive weeks

Interested in joining this group?

Building Confidence and Social Competencies - Supporting Children & Teens with Learning Differences and Academic Challenges

Utilizing a cognitive-behavioral (CBT) framework, this group is geared towards helping children and teens with learning differences build self-confidence, explore their feelings about academic challenges, and hone interpersonal skills amongst their peers. Sessions will address specific social-emotional goals through collaborative activities and interactional instruction. Participants will enhance their self-esteem, feel less alone and stigmatized in regards to their academic difficulties, and develop their ability to self-advocate and seek out support when needed. Our goal is to help students recognize personal strengths, gain the courage to try new skills, and have a positive social experience that will generalize to their peer groups at school.

Facilitator: Dr. Mollie Dee

Location: Georgetown Office

Start Date: Friday, June 17, 4:00 – 5:00 PM. Groups will take place for 6 consecutive weeks

Interested in joining this group?

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